title.
 
 
Start Here! --> Intro | Why Java ME (J2ME)? | Java ME (J2ME) Notes   
The Box of Lists
yellow point. List of Java ME (J2ME) Devices
yellow point. List of Emulators, SDKs, and IDEs
yellow point. List of Java ME (J2ME) Download Sites (Games, Business apps, etc)
yellow point. List of Java ME (J2ME) Books
yellow point. List of Java ME (J2ME) Compiled StatsNEW!
yellow point. List of Java BLOGS
yellow point. List of Java ME (J2ME) Forums

The Box of Stats
(Updated Feb 19,2003)
yellow point. More than 20 mobile-network operators have deployed more than 50 million Java-based handsets worldwide.
yellow point. Sales of Java-enabled handsets this year will reach 285 million units, or 58 per cent of total mobile-phone sales worldwide.
yellow point. Sales of Java-enabled handsets will reach 465 million units next year, or 83 per cent of total mobile-handset sales, and hit 100 per cent, or more than 870 million units, in 2008.
yellow point. 112 million javacards were shipped in 2001, which made up 51% of the total number of multi-application smart cards. It is projected that 200 million javacards will be shipped in 2002, making up 56% of the total multi-application smart card market.

New Toolkits/APIs!
yellow point. Blu-ray BD-J Java ME (2006/4/1)

yellow point. Motorola SDK for Java ME (J2ME)™ Version 3.1 (Motorola - 2003/4/24)

yellow point. Java ME (J2ME) Wireless Toolkit 2.0 Beta 2 (javasoft.com - 2003/2/27)

yellow point. JSR 179 Location API for Java ME (J2ME) (jcp.org - 2003/2/27)

yellow point. JSR-000118 Mobile Information Device Profile 2.0 (jcp.org - 2003/1/22)


Developer Contests
yellow point. Motorola MOTOCODER contest!

yellow point. Motorola/Symbol Barcode Scanner Developer Contest

yellow point. Sony Ericsson and Metrowerks announce developer challenge

yellow point. SIMagine 2003, the 4th annual worldwide GSM and JavaCard Developer Contest

yellow point. Insignia Java ME (J2ME) Challenge!

yellow point. Asia Java Mobile Challenge

yellow point. SingTel launches mobile Java applications contest

yellow point. Java Expo 2002 Java ME (J2ME) Contest

yellow point. eGate Open 2002 Smart Card Contest

yellow point. DeviceTop.com's Developer Contest 3

Tell me more.


GetJava Download Button

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Java on your Playstation 3 and your DVD
(2006-3-28)

I'm almost always a skeptic when it comes to claims that Java is suited for almost everything, but we all know what happened when the mobile carriers and manufacturers got together and solidified support for Java on small devices in the early part of this century.

Fast forward to 2005, when a similar consortium of players are starting to solidify around a new standard for DVD players called Blu-Ray.

Read more.

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Sun pushes standardized cell phone Java
(CNET 2004-2-24)

Sun and the cell phone allies began the Java Verified program, which certifies programs to ensure that they'll run on different companies' mobile phones. Running on Java has been a tricky process in the past, with different phones having different features, such as buttons, message handling, processing power, and sound and graphics capabilities.

Read more.

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Java Technology Is Everywhere, Surpasses 1.5 Billion Devices Worldwide
(PR News 2004-2-20)

Sun Microsystems, Inc. (Nasdaq: SUNW), the creator and leading advocate for Java(TM) technology, today demonstrated the ubiquity and security of the Java platform by announcing that 1.5 billion devices around the world are powered by Java technology. Java technology is the essential ingredient for a better digital and connected experience. It powers everything from secure identity cards to mobile phones, printers, Web cams, automobile telematics, desktops, medical equipment, servers, jet engines, the navigation controls for NASA's Mars Rover, and more.

New Java technology-based digital identity smart card deployments include the National Aeronautic and Science Administration (NASA) and the Government of Thailand. These new wins build on Java technology handset momentum, currently deployed by 77 operators worldwide including AT&T Wireless, China Mobile, China Unicom, Cingular Wireless, NTT DoCoMo, Orange, T-Mobile, Vodafone, and many others.

Read more.

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BREW vs Java: Cornered by success
(Telecomasia.com 2003-10-15)

BREW and Java ME (J2ME) are more complementary than competitive, but with Java getting market traction and Korea pushing WIPI, BREW is finding its critical acclaim overshadowed.

Whatever happens in the evolution of wireless data, Qualcomm’s BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) is likely go down in history as one of the more misunderstood technologies. For a start, BREW is widely seen as a direct competitor to Java ME (J2ME), despite the fact that that BREW has always had Java ME (J2ME) support in its roadmap, with the BREW thin client designed to run closer to the chipset, allowing it to run beneath the JVM.

However, perception counts for a lot in this business, and the perception of BREW has always been that it is in competition with Java ME (J2ME) as the preferred platform for running downloadable apps. Unfortunately for Qualcomm, the other perception is that Java ME (J2ME) will ultimately dominate the market, leaving BREW relegated to its CDMA niche.

Read more.

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Embedded Java taking over in consumer, mobile devices
(LinuxDevices 2003-9-25)

Market researcher Venture Development Corp. (VDC) has published a report showing the proliferation of Java in the embedded systems market, especially in consumer electronics and mobile devices such as PDAs and smartphones. VDC predicts that nearly 75 million Java-enabled devices will ship this year, growing to 600 million by 2007. A brief summary appears below.

Read more.

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Embedded Java Seen As Leader In Mobile Consumer Devices
(Techweb 2003-9-22)

Embedded Java systems used to run applications within mobile phones and other consumer devices are expected over the next several years to lead competing technology from Microsoft Corp. and Qualcomm, a market research firm said Monday.

The number of mobile phones and other handheld devices that ship with embedded Java to run multimedia applications, such as games, is expected to reach 74.9 million units this year, increasing to 601 million units by 2007, Venture Development Corp. of Natick, Mass., said.

In comparison, Qualcomm's BREW technology is expected to be in 8.5 million devices shipped this year. The application development environment runs only on Qualcomm's CDMA, a wireless phone technology with less than 15 percent of the worldwide cellular phone market, VDC analyst Chris Lanfear said. BREW stands for binary runtime environment for wireless.

Microsoft's .Net Compact Framework, on the other hand, has had even less success in the market than BREW. "I know of no devices out there that are using the .Net Compact Framework as an environment," Lanfear said.

Read more.

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On Track to Improved Communication using Java
(InternetWeek 2003-9-22)

I test drove TeleNavTrack using a Motorola GPS-enabled, Java-enabled phone with the TeleNavTrack software installed (the phone must be supported by Nextel). All administration is accomplished via a browser-based interface that controls server applications running at TeleNav's NOC (network operations center). When a driver checks in using the software on the phone, it sends his location to the hosted system in the NOC. The TeleTrack software periodically interacts with the back-end systems to download messages and report on location.

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Corporate Data in Hand
(CRM daily 2003-9-17)

CIOS and IT managers are always straggling to improve the availability of corporate data to those who need it to run the business. In the case of sales-people and mobile executives, that's a tall order. Ideally, you would use the very gear that these people already carry -- such as PDAs or cell phones -- to act as messaging systems and data terminals that can fetch customer information or place an order.

Unfortunately, the vast differences among these devices -- Pocket PCs running Windows CE, PDAs running Palm OS or Linux, cell phones running the Symbian OS -- pose significant problems for developers. Even the cell phones from a single vendor, such as Motorola (the company I work for), can vary widely in processor type, memory amount, and LCD screen dimensions. Worse, new handsets sporting new features, such as built-in cameras and Bluetooth networking, are released every six months to nine months.

For IT managers whose chief concern is that applications running on device A today also run on device B tomorrow, the best choice among development platforms is Java ME (J2ME), a slimmed-down version of Java tailored for use on embedded and mobile devices.

Read more.

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Interactive Weakest Link game hits mobile phones
(Revolution Magazine 2003-9-8)

Fans of the hit BBC show 'The Weakest Link' will be able to play a version of the quiz on their mobile phones. Viewers will be able to pay and download the game via Sky Active's mobile games service Your Games. The game is available for a range of Nokia and Sharp Java-enabled handsets and there are plans to offer it via other portals and operators in the UK.

Read more.

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Smart Time for Smart Cards?
(CIO.com 2003-9-8)

THE DEPARTMENT OF Defense has three million of them now and is moving to get another 1.5 million by year's end. The government of Taiwan has 24 million and possibly many more to come. What are they? Java-based smart cards. Worldwide, there are hundreds of millions floating around. So why aren't you using them?

Read more.

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Palm pushes Java PDA effort
(Adtmag.com 2003-9-9)

To date, Java originator Sun has aimed much of its embedded Java ME (J2ME) virtual machine effort at cell phone gadgets -- an effort that may be beginning to pay off. But there is a need to address the wide market of PDA gadgets with Java-class development tools, according to product managers at Palm.

"What Sun has done with Java has been so bloody cell phone-focused. Now it's time for Java ME (J2ME) to take on a bigger application role on a more powerful device," said Morgan, who is director, strategic alliances in the Palm Solutions Group. In fact, Palm turned not to Sun but to IBM to obtain a Java virtual machine and tools.

Read more.

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palmOne and IBM launch MIDP 2.0 for Palm devices
(admpartners.com 2003-9-7)

Palm has licensed IBM's WebSphere Micro Environment (WME), a fully compliant Java ME (J2ME) runtime. WME will be available for all future Palm Tungsten handhelds."

The WME should be available as a download for Palm Zire 7 and current Tugsten models.

"... included is support for Palm's five-way navigation control, keyboard, and stylus , as well as all other hardware buttons on the device. The Forms implementation provides for a look and feel that is compatible with the standard Palm OS user interface, leveraging its proven usability and functionality."

"Although the initial focus of our Java efforts will be on the core configurations and profiles, Palm will continue to add implementations for new Java Specification Requests. A number of useful extensions to Java ME (J2ME) have been released or are currently under development through the Java Community Process. Palm will actively monitor these developments and announce relevant commercial or reference implementations as they are available."

Check out the live Webcast on September 8, 2003!

Read more.

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Motorola dumps Symbians, says will focus on Java
(ComputerWorld 2003-8-29)

Motorola Inc. is negotiating the sale of its 19% stake in Symbian Ltd. to Nokia Corp. and Psion PLC, the companies announced today.

Although Motorola is selling its stake in Symbian, that doesn't mark the end of the two companies' relationship, according to Motorola spokesman Patrick Hamilton. Motorola released its first smart phone based on the Symbian operating system yesterday and will continue to use Symbian's software under license.

The real focus of Motorola's smart-phone development effort is Java, Hamilton said. "The actual operating system being used is not that relevant. Our position on Java is not dependent on us using one OS. We will continue to use a number of operating systems," he said.

Read more.

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Handy and Jamba introduce mobile karaoke
(Telecom.com 2003-8-27)

Ireland-based Alatto Technologies unique air.karaoke mobile karaoke product has been launched as a full commercial service by Handy and Jamba, which between them boast over 6 million registered users. They cover the markets of Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland, Austria and UK. Handy and Jamba are offering a wide range of karaoke songs both international and local suitable for their selected markets. The applications are delivered to the customer as self playing java applications for a wide range of handsets. The polyphonic audio is synched with lyrics text displayed on the "small screen".

Read more.

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Mobile gaming 'set to explode'
(BBC 2003-8-26)

Mobile gaming is seen by many as the next big thing, as phones become more powerful and come with colour screens.

"This has been a very good year for mobile gaming," said games consultant Robert Tercek.

"With what's happening in Asia, Europe and North America, we're well on track towards a billion dollar market in 2004," he said.

Read more.

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Java ME (J2ME) connects corporate data to wireless devices
(Infoworld.com 2003-8-23)

CIOs and IT managers are always struggling to improve the availability of corporate data to those who need it to run the business.

Unfortunately, the vast differences among these devices Pocket PCs running Windows CE, PDAs running Palm OS or Linux, cell phones running the Symbian OS pose significant problems for developers.

For IT managers whose chief concern is that applications running on device A today also run on device B tomorrow, the best choice among development platforms is Java ME (J2ME), a slimmed-down version of Java tailored for use on embedded and mobile devices.

Read more.

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Motorola launches first Linux smartphone
(The Register 2003-8-22)

Motorola yesterday launched its first Linux-based smartphone into the Far Eastern market. Announced last February, the A760 uses Linux as a core operating system, on top of which Java provides a multimedia application framework.

Read more.

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Pitfalls of Java ME (J2ME) development
(Infoworld 2003-8-22)

Java ME (J2ME) does a splendid job of promoting application portability across a diverse set of embedded devices. But some Java ME (J2ME) specs are vague enough that each vendor's Java ME (J2ME) implementation might handle key sections of code in different ways. What follows is a rogue's gallery of maddening variations that can stymie application portability.

Read more.

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Smartphones "to eclipse handheld computers"
(FT.com 2003-8-20)

Sales of the handheld computer, that icon of the nineties technology boom, will be eclipsed this year by the new breed of smartphones, combining address book and calendar functions with the capacity to make calls, according to an industry report.

This will be the second straight year of declines in handheld sales, also known as personal digital assistants (PDAs), which are supplied by Dell, Hewlett-Packard, Research in Motion (RIM) and Palm among others. Although sales will recover slightly in 2004, IDC expects PDAs to be a 15m units-a-year market rather than previous forecasts of 20m units-a-year.

Read more.

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Battle for mobile gaming space brewing
(Inquirer.net 2003-8-19)

THE INQ has recently been subjected to missives from a number of companies all claiming to be the leaders in the field of mobile gaming. Surely they can't allbe the major supplier of such solutions?

Interestingly, there is a common theme. They mostly seem to believe that Java is for high end handsets and that proprietary solutions can execute games much faster in low cost mobile handsets.

Read more.

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Cellular firms bet on wireless games
(Forbes.com 2003-8-18)

Carriers are hoping to reap large rewards from wireless gaming.

Read more.

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Orange acknowledges necessity of Java for MS smartphone
(Geek.com 2003-8-12)

"Java is obviously not included in the spec from Microsoft but phone manufacturers can do whatever they want with the phone, so expect more MS-powered phones to ship with Java ME (J2ME) support. It looks like Orange finally decided that Java ME (J2ME) was a necessity."

Read more.

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Vodafone live sharp phone gains due to java games
(Telecom.paper 2003-8-12)

"We can safely state that the considerable interest shown in the Sony Ericsson T610 is continuing, and that the Sharp GX10i has also climbed high up on the list. One of the main attractions of the Sharp GX10i is that customers can download Java games from the Vodafone live portal," says Tommy Sundstrom, Vice President of Vodafone Sweden and in charge of Vodafone's retail chain in Sweden.

Read more.

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RealNetworks embraces Java with Sprint PCS content deal
(RCR News 2003-8-11)

Streaming-video company RealNetworks Inc. today announced a deal with Sprint PCS to offer an Internet-style media player to Sprint’s Vision customers—an offering that marks a significant change in RealNetworks’ wireless strategy.

RealNetworks will offer its content, which includes feeds from CNN, NPR and others, through a Java application instead of through its RealOne player for wireless devices. RealNetworks also will host the service. The move is both a nod to the growing dominance of Java technology and its associated distribution channel and to the difficulty of selling a proprietary player to handset manufacturers.

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Myths and facts of "Java Everywhere"
(Javaranch.com 2003-8-11)

The big news from this year's JavaOne conference is "Java Everywhere". What exactly is "Java Everywhere"? It seems that there are a lot of confusions or even resistance from existing Java developers. I attempt to clarify some myths through a series of FAQs in this short article.

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Schlumberger selected for China Unicom's first over the air project
(IT Web 2003-8-11)

Schlumberger Smart Cards & Terminals, a business unit of Schlumberger Limited, today announced it will supply Zhejiang Unicom, a subsidiary of China Unicom, with Simgo, its unique Java-based Over-The-Air (OTA) service management solution. Zhejiang Unicom will be the first China Unicom subsidiary to commercialize its OTA services on advanced 64K SIM cards, setting the stage for future development of OTA short messaging system (SMS) services.

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Tipping Point
(JavaPro 2003-8-8)

More of the pieces are filling in for wireless Java. For years, the promise of rich, plentiful Java applications on mobile and embedded devices has been held out as Java's land of opportunity. But real applications beyond games and ring tones have remained elusive, especially in the U.S. market. Now, with important developments in infrastructure, user experience, and business models, we are nearer to reaching the tipping point where development of Java-based digital content and services will be readily monetized through established channels of distribution.

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Nextel And Descartes Bring Real-Time Dispatch Solutions To Market To Improve Customers' Communication And Visibility In The Field
(java.sun.com 2003-8-6)

The Descartes Systems Group Inc., a trusted provider of logistics solutions and Nextel Communications, Inc., a leading digital wireless provider, today announced that they will offer customers two Descartes MobileLink™ applications, MobileLink:Status™ and MobileLink:Frieght ™, for real-time fleet management and dispatch capabilities using Nextel's Java™ technology-enabled phones and the Nextel Nationwide Network.

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Target Visa Introduces Smart Coupons for Java smartcards
(Lurker's Guide to Java ME (J2ME) 2003-8-5)

Target Visa introduced in late July the ability for customers to download smart coupons into their Visa Java smart cards via an attached smart card reader. The coupons are redeemable upon purchase of the items. Items to purchase include such things as soap, soft drinks, and other smaller items, many with instant $1 off.

Target had initially mailed 2.5 million smart cards to their customers, including a free smart card reader in September, 2001.

To check out the smart coupons, click here. To apply online, click here.

Read more.

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A Saga of Palm Java Development
(java.net 2003-8-5)

A little while ago I mentioned that I was looking into development of some Palm applications. I've been torn between C/C++ development and Java, and digging into the tool set available led to some interesting findings.

Preliminary investigation into the Java realm left me feeling a bit underwhelmed. I kept getting the feeling that the commercial vendors were more interested in pushing a (poorly defined) agenda. For example, can I ship the JVM or do I have to require my users to download and install it independently? I got some rather fuzzy answers to that one, which left me feeling a bit confused. It just seemed that things weren't too mature.

Read more.

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diego's excellent symbian adventure, part one
(javablog 2003-8-5)

This is the first in a series of articles that describe my experiences learning my way around the Symbian platform. Going into it, what I knew wasn't much. One of my interests was using Java to develop applications for Symbian phones.

Read more.

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The Yin and Yang of Mobile Java ME (J2ME)
(java.net 2003-7-31)

Just what is Java ME (J2ME) technology good for in the real world anyway?

My answer: The Java ME (J2ME) Platform is fantastic for building and deploying mobile applications that allow people to do one of two things:

  1. Save time
  2. Waste time

The key issue to the success of both: Wireless devices are personal and with us everywhere we go. That fact gives mobile applications an edge over PC or even standard Web applications in the time-to-solution arena, whether the problem being solved is a sales and support issue or how to get past level three of a favorite game while at the beach with your friends.

Take it as a top priority to empower users to save time or waste time better than anybody else if you want to maximize your chances for mobile development success.

Read more.

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Summus and Sprint Bring `AP Photos, News and Sports' TO PCS Vision Customers
(javasoft.com 2003-7-30)

Summus, Inc. (USA), a developer of applications and information processing tools that optimize the wireless multimedia experience, and Sprint, which operates the largest all-digital, all-PCS nationwide wireless network in the United States, today announce the availability of AP Photos, News & Sports, powered by BlueFuel, to PCS Vision(SM) customers. With AP Photos, News & Sports, PCS Vision customers can use their mobile phones to view top news headlines, photos and news stories, plus sports and world news photos and captions, all from AP Digital, a division of The Associated Press. AP Photos, News & Sports, a Java ME (J2ME) application, is powered by BlueFuel. The application is available on select Java-enabled PCS Vision phones for $2.99 for 30-days.

Read more.

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Palm Solutions Group opens applications door to Java
(ZDNet 2003-7-29)

In one of the first moves to demonstrate that Palm Solutions Group (the hardware guys) and operating-system spinout PalmSource (the software guys) are two autonomous companies, Palm Solutions Group (PSG) has announced that it will be making a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) available for all of its Tungsten handheld offerings: the Bluetooth-enabled "T," the wireless wide area network-enabled "W," and the Wi-Fi enabled "C."

Prior to the announcement, Java developers had limited access to the Palm market. If they wanted their applications to run on the Palm OS, their only choice was to redevelop their applications natively for the Palm platform, or to get their target customers to buy, install, and configure a JVM from a third party like Insignia. With this announcement, the "anywhere" part of the Java promise --- the ability to write software once and deploy it anywhere --- is closer to reality. The target for Java developers will grow by the number of Tungstens that are in the market.

(PSG director of strategic alliances Chris Morgan Neither is not) saying whether PSG might do what Research in Motion did. RIM turned its Blackberry into a pure Java machine and recoded its built-in applications in Java. "Recoding apps is definitely an option for us. We can start to look at all the applications --- browsers, e-mail, etc --- and decide which is the most efficient way--to write it for the Palm OS or for Java. We will have to make a decision. But for now, we're not doing this as an exclusion of Palm OS APIs. We're making sure the development community has a choice."

Read more.

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Sports sites plan launch of mobile Java services
(News Media Zero 2003-7-24)

The online sports industry is to be one of the first to adopt Java for content beyond mobile gaming, with a number of players launching downloadable services in the next few months.

Content owners including Sky Sports, UK Betting and Rivals are launching Java services to boost the functionality of their mobile offerings and to gain a position on consumers' handset real estate.

Mobile Java downloads enable content owners to establish branded content mini-portals on a user's handset. Java also allows content to be dynamically updated.

'Java lets us provide a high level of information and lets us compete with services like Vodafone Live!,' said Oli Roxburgh, Rivals head of mobile services. 'We're launching a Java Match centre, then we'll add personalisation.'

Read more.

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Java pros grow at 40% annually
(India Economic Times 2003-7-24)

In the last few years personnel trained in Java technology have seen tremendous growth. India has over six lakh Java developers and this is growing by about 40% every year, says KP Unnikrishnan, head, marketing at Sun Microsystems India. He added that there is scope for this market since only 10% of the market has been tapped.

The current projections are that Java-powered handsets shipped next year will exceed total number of PCs and by ’06 more than 1.1bn phones will be capable of running Java, he said. Java-based phones raise their information capacity allowing for more data.

Developers prefer working with Java technology because it is an open, standards-based approach.

Read more.

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Smartphone sales rocket past Handhelds
(The Register 2003-7-23)

Among PDA providers, Palm and Sony showed significant year-on-year growth of 45 per cent and 64 per cent, respectively. HP's shipments grew too, by two per cent, but not enough to prevent its market share tumbling from 36% to 25%.

Among smartphone vendors, Nokia unsurprisingly took the lion's share of the market - 78 per cent of it. Indeed, Nokia shipped more smartphones during Q2 2003 than the PDA guys combined. The number two, Sony Ericsson, only accounted for 15 per cent of shipments, but its growth was almost four times that of its rival.

Shipments of PDAs with and without wireless communications - what Canalys terms 'data-centric devices' - jumped 51 per cent during the second quarter to 2003, from 415,350 units in Q2 2002 to 627,520. By contrast, shipments of smartphones 'voice-centric' handhelds - rocketed 1156 per cent during the same timeframe, from 85,050 devices to 1,068,430.

Read more.

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Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Angel of Darkness Java ME (J2ME) Mobile Game
(About.com 2003-7-21)

While Angelina Jolie must use wires to simulate the acrobatics of Lara Croft in Lara Croft, Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life. In real life, Lara Croft has gone wireless. AT&T Wireless mMode customers can download a free, preview version of Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Angel of Darkness. The full mobile version of the game can be ordered in September.

It's been two years since a new Tomb Raider video game was released. Now, comes Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Angel of Darkness. And, with the release of the film Lara Croft, Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life, AT&T announces a downloadable mobile game version of Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Angel of Darkness.

Read more.

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Palm SG Hopes IBM’s Java ME (J2ME) Will Win Over the Enterprise
(Brighthand 2003-7-21)

The Palm Solutions Group has licensed IBM's Java 2 Micro Edition (Java ME (J2ME)) runtime environment for use in future Tungsten handhelds.

While this isn't as exciting to most people as, say, a new handheld, it's an important development in the Palm SG's plans to increase its sales to large companies. While the Palm OS dominates this area, large companies buy only a small percentage of handhelds, with most going to consumers. By making its Tungsten handhelds better able to connect to corporate backend systems with IBM's Java tools, the Palm SG hopes to convince these companies to buy large number of handhelds for their employees.

Palm's developer community will have access to a Java ME (J2ME) runtime that will be developed for the best possible performance on Tungsten handhelds. The more than 3 million members of the Java development community will be able to develop and deploy business applications for mobile workforces without having to learn a new programming language.

Read more.

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New PalmSource CEO on Java ME (J2ME) and Palm
(ZDNet 2003-7-21)

ZDNet: The real opportunity for PalmSource is to tap in to the Java developer base because of its size-- roughly 3 million developers. Most if not all of them are experienced in building network-based applications, which is important as more and more handheld applications --- especially enterprise ones --- are expected to work over wireless networks with a lot of latency. Why doesn't PalmSource focus on one of the largest and fastest growing developer bases as opposed to the relatively small number of developers focused on the PalmOS? Also, many of ZDNet's readers have complained about how there are different versions of the PalmOS currently shipping with different PalmOS-based devices and how there are software incompatibilities between them. Why does that situation exist? The reason these questions are related is because, with Java as a development target, you get to move away from the question of whether it's Palm OS 4, Palm OS 5, or the next one.

Read more.

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